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Poems For Patience

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Article by Kate Dempsey © 3 February 2019.
Posted in Guest Blogs ().

Galway University Hospitals Arts Trust is seeking entries again for its annual poetry competition. The poetry competition is run in conjunction with the Poems For Patience series as part of Cúirt International Festival of Literature which runs from April 8th – 14th in Galway.

Deadline: Friday February 22nd. 

The prize as part of the annual poetry competition includes: the winner will have his/her poem published and displayed on the Arts Corridor of University Hospital Galway as part of the 2019 Poems For Patience series.

The poems, after exhibition on the Arts Corridor, are then displayed in waiting areas throughout Galway University Hospitals.

The winner will also be invited to read his or her winning poem at the launch of the 2019 Poems For Patience at Cúirt International Festival of Literature in April 2019;  given a copy of their poem printed and framed as a Poem for Patience poster and invited to submit six poems for consideration to be a Featured Reader at the Over The Edge: Open Reading series in Galway City Library.

The aim of Poems for Patience is to provide access to poetry for patients, their families, staff, visitors and the wider hospital community. Waiting areas are used by patients and their loved ones on a daily basis, in outpatient clinics, going for scans, x-rays and other tests as inpatients.

The competition judge is Kevin Higgins. 

Poems entered in the competition should be no more than 32 lines long.

ENTRY FEE

To enter one poem the fee is €10. If you enter two or more poems the entry fee is €7.50 per poem i.e. to enter two poems it costs €15, to enter three poems €22.50 and so on.

Details here


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KATE DEMPSEY runs writing.ie's Poetic License blog and is our poetry guru. She is a writer and a blogger living in Maynooth. She writes fiction and non-fiction as well as poetry and is widely published in Ireland and abroad, in magazines, anthologies and on the radio. She fits this around her family and a full time job, writing on the sofa, on the train and in that little coffeeshop on the corner.

Poetry can be a solitary activity and she appreciates the support she received from the online community, particularly when starting out. She is excited about continuing the dialogue with her blog here.