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Irish writers on shortlist for Society of Authors’ Awards 2018

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Article by writingie © 13 June 2018 Writing.ie .
Posted in the Magazine ( · News for Writers ).

The shortlists for the Betty Trask, McKitterick, Tom-Gallon and Somerset Maugham awards were announced by The Society of Authors today (Wednesday 13th June) with Man Booker nominated Fiona Mozley, 2014 Tom-Gallon award winner Benjamin Myers, Eric Gregory award winning poet Miriam Nash, Irish writers Valerie O’Riordan and Chris Connolly and debut novelists Eli Goldstone, Omar Robert Hamilton, Masande Ntshanga and Sarah Day amongst the 22 shortlisted names.

The four prizes will be awarded at The Authors’ Awards on Thursday 19th July, a unique night of riches with all the awards judged by authors for authors. The event has rewarded the early works of some of today’s most prominent literary figures such as Zadie Smith, Seamus Heaney, Helen Dunmore, Hari Kunzru, Carol Ann Duffy and Mark Haddon and the evening will see the UK’s biggest literary fund of more than £98,000 awarded to established and emerging writers of fiction, non-fiction and poetry.

The judges for each award, including Joanne Harris, Samantha Shannon, Frances Fyfield, Abir Mukherjee, Irenosen Okojie, Jen Campbell and Paul Bailey, were united in their praise for ‘compelling, sophisticated, original and emotionally charged’ writing with stories taking the reader from the landscapes of rural and urban Britain and on to the streets of Cairo, Cape Town, Australia and beyond, via themes of grief, love, justice, family and revolution.

THE SHORTLISTS FOR EACH AWARD ARE:

BETTY TRASK PRIZE AND AWARDS:
The Betty Trask Prize and Awards are presented for a first novel by a writer under 35.

• Mussolini’s Island by Sarah Day (Tinder Press)
• All the Good Things by Clare Fisher (Viking)
• Strange Heart Beating by Eli Goldstone (Granta)
• The City Always Wins by Omar Robert Hamilton (Faber and Faber)
• Bad Ideas/Chemicals by Lloyd Markham (Parthian)
• The Reactive by Masanda Ntshanga (Jacaranda)

“The Trask shortlist is always very strong, very original, and this year is no different – six books reflecting the excellent quality and diversity of new writers today. We have Clare Fisher’s touching, tough and incisive view of what it’s like to be a child in care, robbed of choices; Eli Goldstone’s fable-like tale that spirits the reader from London to the deep forests of Latvia; Lloyd Markham’s death stare at society, sharp as a syringe and gloriously weird; Masande Ntshanga depiction of the gritty reality of Cape Town in 2003 through the smoky lens of the young and high; Omar Robert Hamilton’s tough, bleak and relentless work – a challenging, heart-wrenching and in many ways, necessary novel; while Sarah Day presents a powerful but little-known historical narrative that needed to be told.” Judges Ben Brooks, Joanne Harris and Samantha Shannon.

Past winners include Zadie Smith, David Szalay, Hari Kunzru and Sarah Waters. Total prize and award fund is £26,250.

McKITTERICK PRIZE:
The McKitterick Prize is awarded to a first novel by a writer over 40.

• Darke by Rick Gekoski (Canongate Books)
• Radio Sunrise by Anietie Isong (Jacaranda)
• The Seven Imperfect Rules of Elvira Carr by Frances Maynard (Pan Macmillan)
• Yes by Anne Patterson (Silvertail Books)
• The Woolgrower’s Companion by Joy Rhoades (Chatto & Windus)

“The fabulous debut novels in this year’s McKitterick shortlist take us from the open spaces of the Australian outback to inner worlds filled with loss, hope and self-acceptance. We have a deliriously well-written tale of impending old age and bereavement; a small volume about an utterly likeable Nigerian journalist, which stays long in the imagination; the quiet, inspirational story of the dilemmas faced by an autistic daughter after her powerfully protective mother dies; a perfect, mesmerising book about a woman after a stroke, which feels as if it contains half a lifetime of observation; and a tale set in the Australian outback at the end of World War II, full of moral dilemmas, brutality and humanity.” Judges Frances Fyfield, Aamer Hussein and Abir Mukherjee.

Past winners include Helen Dunmore, Mark Haddon and Petinah Gappah. Total prize fund £5,250.

TOM-GALLON TRUST AWARD:
The Tom-Gallon Trust Award is awarded for a short story by a writer who has had at least one short story accepted for publication.

• The Speed of Light and How it Cannot Help Us by Chris Connolly
• My Body Cannot Forget your Body by Kirsty Logan
• A Thousand Acres of English Soil by Benjamin Myers
• Livestock by Valerie O’Riordan
• It Was a Very Good Year by Gabi Reigh
• A Brief Period of Rejoicing by Jacky Taylor

“These six writers show how the short story form continues to excite. Ben Myers vividly paints generations of lives lived close to the earth, among birds and animals. Chris Connolly gives us a compelling, taut, emotionally charged evocation on loss. Gabi Reigh writes about large matters – exile, alienation, differences of language and culture – all hinted at with delicacy. Jacky Taylor explores the magic of small things and the tantalising allure of what could have been. Kirsty Logan’s imaginative, darkly beautiful piece is striking and assured – the boldest of the stories on the list. And the eagle-eyed protagonist of Valerie O’Riordan’s funny, acerbic rollicking tale seizes the reader’s attention immediately.” Judges Paul Bailey and Irenosen Okojie.

Previous winners include Benjamin Myers, Lucy Wood, Grace Ingoldby and Claire Harman. Total award fund £1,575.

SOMERSET MAUGHAM AWARDS:
The Somerset Maugham Awards are for published works of fiction, non-fiction or poetry by writers under 35, to enable them to enrich their work by gaining experience of foreign countries.

• Kumukanda by Kayo Chingonyi – poetry (Chatto & Windus)
• Fortune Cookie by Jenna Clake – poetry (Eyewear Publishing)
• The Unrivalled Transcendence of Willem J. Gyle – novel (Andrew Lownie)
• Elmet by Fiona Mozley – novel (J M Originals)
• All the Prayers in the House by Miriam Nash – poetry (Bloodaxe Books)

“In judging this year’s Somerset Maugham Award shortlist we’ve discovered five wildly different but equally excellent young writers. From poetry – Kayo Chingonyi’s playful, nostalgic poignance, Jenna Clake’s unique vision, and Miriam Nash’s hypnotic sense of place – to fiction – J.D. Dixon’s unforgiving, surprising and powerful narrative, and Fiona Mozley’s visionary book, written in luminous prose – it’s a privilege to include these writers and their work.” Judges Jen Campbell, Barney Norris and Ian Thomson

Past winners include Hari Kunzru, Helen Oyeyemi, Julian Barnes, Zadie Smith and Jonathan Freedland. Total prize fund £15,750.

The Authors’ Awards, presented by Stephen Fry, will take place at RIBA on the evening of Thursday 19th July and will play host to 400 guests from across publishing and SoA membership. Further awards presented on the evening will include the Eric Gregory Award for a collection of poems by a poet under 30, the Cholmondely Award for a body of work by a poet, the Elizabeth Longford Prize for Historical Biography, the winner of which has already been released as Giles Tremlett for Isabella of Castile: Europe’s First Great Queen (Bloomsbury) and The Travelling Scholarships awarded to British creative writers to enable them to keep in contact with writing colleagues abroad.

A unique evening of celebration, each award is chosen by authors for authors and judged by celebrated authors, writers and poets; many former winners themselves.

ABOUT THE SHORTLISTEES:

BETTY TRASK PRIZE AND AWARD:

SARAH DAY SHORTLISTED FOR MUSSOLINI’S ISLAND (TINDER PRESS)
Sarah Day is a writer and science communicator. With a background in the history and philosophy of science, she has also written non-fiction for publications including The Guardian, The Vagenda and the British Society for Literature and Science. She works as an Earth Science Communicator at the Geological Society of London. SARAH LIVES IN LONDON.
Samantha Shannon, Betty Trask judge says: “A love story and a cry for justice, rendered in beautiful prose, Mussolini’s Island offers an intimate and unflinching record of a little-known atrocity of Fascist Italy.”
CLARE FISHER FOR ALL THE GOOD THINGS (VIKING)
Clare Fisher was born in Tooting, south London in 1987. After accidentally getting obsessed with writing fiction when she should have been studying for a BA in History at the University of Oxford, Clare completed an MA in Creative and Life Writing at Goldsmiths College, University of London. An avid observer of the diverse area of south London in which she grew up, Clare’s writing is inspired by her long-standing interest in social exclusion and the particular ways in which it affects vulnerable women and girls. CLARE LIVES IN LEEDS, where she writes, teaches creative writing and works as a bookseller.
Samantha Shannon, Betty Trask judge says: “All the Good Things is not only a piercing reminder of how society continues to fail its most vulnerable people, but a celebration of love, endurance, and redemption in the most desperate of circumstances.”

ELI GOLDSTONE FOR STRANGE HEART BEATING (GRANTA)
Eli Goldstone is a graduate of the City University Creative Writing (Novels) MA. She is the former prose editor of Cadaverine. ELI LIVES IN LONDON.
Joanne Harris, Betty Trask judge says: “Poetic, strange and compelling, this is both the work of an extraordinary stylist, and a sure-footed exploration into the nature and psychology of grief.”

OMAR ROBERT HAMILTON FOR THE CITY ALWAYS WINS (FABER AND FABER)
Omar Robert Hamilton is an award-winning filmmaker and writer. He has written for the Guardian, the London Review of Books, Mada Masr and Guernica. He is a co-founder of the Palestine Festival of Literature and the Mosireen media collective in Cairo. OMAR LIVES IN CAIRO.
Joanne Harris, Betty Trask judge says: “Tough, bleak and relentless, this is a challenging, thought-provoking, heart-wrenching and in many ways, necessary novel – we have all, after all, watched these events from the safety of our TV screens, but this glimpse into the reality of the events of 2011 is a wholly different, immersive – and ultimately rewarding – experience.”
LLOYD MARKHAM, SHORTLISTED FOR BAD IDEAS/CHEMICALS (PARTHIAN)
Lloyd Markham was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, moving to and settling in Bridgend, south Wales when he was thirteen. He spent the rest of his teenage years miserable and strange and having bad nights out before undertaking a BA in Writing at Glamorgan followed by an MPhil. He enjoys noise music, Japanese animation and the documentaries of Adam Curtis. He operates synthesisers in a band called Deep Hum and has less bad nights out these days. LLOYD LIVES IN CARDIFF.
Joanne Harris, Betty Trask Judge says: “A quirky, surreal and often very funny story by a talented new writer: Red Dwarf meets Trainspotting, narrated in a new, original voice.”

MASANDE NTSHANGA FOR THE REACTIVE (JACARANDA)
Masande Ntshanga is the winner of the inaugural PEN International New Voices Award in 2013, and a finalist for the Caine Prize in 2015. He was born in East London in 1986 and graduated with a degree in Film and Media and an Honours degree in English Studies from UCT, where he became a creative writing fellow, completing his Masters in Creative Writing under the Mellon Mays Foundation. He received a Fulbright Award, an NRF Freestanding Masters scholarship, a Civitella Ranieri Fellowship and a Bundanon Trust Award. His work has appeared in The White Review, Chimurenga, VICE and n + 1. He has also written for Rolling Stone magazine. MASANDE LIVES IN JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA.
Samantha Shannon, Betty Trask judge says: “In The Reactive, Ntshanga shows us the gritty reality of Cape Town in 2003 through the smoky lens of the young and high – and deftly explores the complexities of friendship, identity, guilt, family and nihilism through his young narrator, Lindanathi, whose liminal existence is interrupted by a message from his past. An important and triumphant debut.”

MCKITTERICK PRIZE

RICK GEKOSKI FOR DARKE (CANONGATE BOOKS)
Rick Gekoski – described by Tatler as “think Bill Bryson, only on books” – is a rare book dealer, writer, and broadcaster. An American who came to England in 1966 (and now a dual citizen, feeling “equally ill at ease in both cultures”), he has published many non-fiction books, including a critical book on Joseph Conrad, The Bibliography of William Golding. He has founded two private presses, has served as a judge for the Man Booker Prize, and was elected an Honorary Vice-President of English Pen in 2014. RICK LIVES IN SALISBURY, WILTSHIRE
Frances Fyfield, McKitterick judge says: “Deliriously well written, moving and mordantly funny, this tale of impending old age, bereavement, is suffused with literature and includes writing of barbaric elegance, tenderness, bile and wit. This misanthrope done good in illuminating darkness. He can turn coal dust into joy.”
ANIETIE ISONG FOR RADIO SUNRISE (JACARANDA)
Anietie Isong has worked as a journalist, speechwriter and public relations manager in the UK and abroad. His writing has received some awards, including a Commonwealth Short Story Award and the Remember Oluwale Writing Prize. Anietie holds an MA in Communications from the University of Leicester, and completed a PhD in New Media and Writing at De Montfort University, Leicester. ANIETIE LIVES IN LONDON.
Frances Fyfield, McKitterick judge says: “A small volume, staying long in the imagination, with the huge backdrop of a young, utterly likeable Nigerian journalist trying to live a life and get ahead. Lovely, simple first-person narrative of youthful manhood, getting it wrong, getting it right, learning on the hoof. Makes the reader long to meet him, while engendering both hope and despair for the society he inhabits, all enlivened by humour. ”

FRANCES MAYNARD FOR THE SEVEN IMPERFECT RULES OF ELVIRA CARR (PAN MACMILLAN)
Frances Maynard teaches English part-time to adults with learning difficulties, including Asperger’s. She is married with one grown-up daughter and lives in Dorset. She also spends time in Blackheath south-east London. FRANCES LIVE IN POOLE, DORSET.
Frances Fyfield, McKitterick judge says: “Explores the dilemma of a twenty seven year old autistic daughter after her powerfully protective mother dies. The daughter has to learn how to live, using her underrated intelligence and conspicuous honesty to form rules for her own existence… this is a quiet, informative and inspirational Journey into the unknown, with a fantastic narrator.”

ANNE PATTERSON FOR YES (SILVERTAIL BOOKS)
Anne lives in London but she lived in Co. Armagh until the age of nine, when her family moved to Ballymoney, County Antrim. She attended Dalriada School. Although she went on to a career in health, she loved the creative side of the school and acknowledges the help of inspirational teachers there. She works in the NHS but has been writing for many years in between shifts. A supportive writing group helps her focus on her writing. She is currently working on her second novel, set between NI and London. Her writing explores the things left unsaid in families and friendships.
ANNE LIVES IN LONDON.

Frances Fyfield, McKitterick judge says: “Small, only apparently discreet, this really feels as if it contains half a lifetime of observation, it features a woman in her fifties, post stroke but sentient, who becomes perforce a listener, rather than a speaker and thus acquires knowledge of her family, and herself, that she did not know she had. A celebration of hope over disaster, self-acceptance, and much else. Ordinary life writ large and small, no tricks, no convenient psychopaths. Just life. A perfect, mesmerising novel.”
JOY RHOADES FOR THE WOOLGROWER’S COMPANION (CHATTO & WINDUS)
Joy Rhoades grew up in a small town in the bush in Queensland, Australia. Her childhood gave her two passions: a love of the Australian landscape and a fascination with words and stories. Her career as a lawyer took her to Hong Kong, Singapore, Tokyo and New York. JOY LIVES IN LONDON.
Frances Fyfield, McKitterick judge says: “Really good historical fiction, featuring the Australian outback at the end of WW2. A young rancher Kate Down has to take on the ranch of her ailing, widowed, but still active father, and take on Italian prisoners of war to run the place. Full of moral dilemmas, brutality, and humanity, this is a terrific first novel that illuminates and unknown corner, while creating characters who can and cannot change their minds.”
TOM-GALLON TRUST AWARD:

CHRIS CONNOLLY FOR THE SPEED OF LIGHT AND HOW IT CANNOT HELP US
Chris Connolly was born in Dublin in 1983. His fiction and poetry has appeared in the Irish Times, the Irish Independent, Southword, the Galway Review and the Hennessy Book of Irish Fiction, among others, and has been broadcast on RTÉ Radio. His work has won numerous awards, including Best Emerging Fiction at the 2016 Hennessy Literary Awards, the RTÉ Francis McManus competition, the Easy Street Magazine ‘Great American Sentence Contest’ and the Over the Edge: New Writer of the Year award. He was highly commended in the Manchester Fiction Prize, and more recently runner-up in the Deborah Rogers Writing Award, and winner of the Ginosko Flash Fiction Competition. CHRIS LIVES IN DUBLIN.
Paul Bailey, Tom-Gallon judge says: “’The Speed of Light and How it Cannot Help Us’ is a beautifully composed story about a harrowing matter. Years of doubt and grief pass by in a very few pages, bringing more incomprehension in their wake. Then a new and fragile piece of evidence in the murder case provides a slight cause for hope. Nothing is overstated here, nothing forced in the deliberately unsensational narrative.”

KIRSTY LOGAN FOR MY BODY CANNOT FORGET YOUR BODY
Kirsty Logan has four books in print: two novels and two short story collections. Her writing has been translated into Japanese and Spanish, recorded for radio and podcasts, exhibited in galleries, and distributed from a vintage Wurlitzer cigarette machine. KIRSTY LIVES IN GLASGOW.

Paul Bailey, Tom-Gallon judge says: “‘My Body Cannot Forget Your Body’ is experimental in style, as befits its subject matter. It’s the boldest of the stories on the short list and probably the most ambitious.”

BENJAMIN MYERS FOR A THOUSAND ACRES OF ENGLISH SOIL
Benjamin Myers was born in Durham, UK, in 1976. He is a journalist and award-winning author of six novels, translated into several languages. The Gallows Pole was the recipient of a SoA Authors’ Foundation Roger Deakin Award in 2016. His latest book, Under The Rock, was published in May. BENJAMIN LIVES IN WEST YORKSHIRE.

Irenosen Okojie, Tom-Gallon judge says: “This is a profound, confident piece. Vividly written, juxtaposing old and new worlds, and the beauty and brutality in between.”

VALERIE O’RIORDAN FOR LIVESTOCK
Valerie O’Riordan is an Irish writer based in Manchester. She holds an MA and a PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Manchester. Her short stories have been published in journals and anthologies including, most recently, matchbook, The Manchester Review, Tin House Online, The Lonely Crowd, LitMag, and (forthcoming) Unthology. She won the Bristol Short Story Prize in 2010 and was shortlisted for the Bridport Prize (flash fiction) in 2010, 2012, 2013 and 2014. In 2017 she was highly commended at the Galley Beggar Short Story Prize and in March 2018 was shortlisted for the Cúirt New Writing Prize (Ireland). VALERIE LIVES IN MANCHESTER.

Paul Bailey, Tom-Gallon judge says: “‘Livestock’ is one of those stories that seizes the reader’s attention immediately, because its narrator is such a strong and individual presence. Thomas Hardy’s farmers’ daughters are nothing like as funny, or as dirty-minded, as this one.”

GABI REIGH FOR IT WAS A VERY GOOD YEAR
Gabi Reigh was born in Romania and studied English and History of Art at UCL. She has been teaching English ‘A’ Level at The Sixth Form College Farnborough for the past fourteen years. In 2017, she won the Open Category of the Stephen Spender Trust prize for her translation of the poem ‘The Traveller’, by the Romanian poet Marin Sorescu. She was also Highly Commended in the ‘Bradt Guides – New Travel Writer of the Year 2017’ competition. Over the past year, she has been working on translating poetry and prose from Romanian from the interwar period, including the collection Poems of Light by Lucian Blaga and two novels by Mihail Sebastian. GABI LIVES IN HOOK, HAMPSHIRE.

Irenosen Okojie, Tom-Gallon judge says: ” An unsettling, quietly charged, clever narrative. I was intrigued right down to the last word.”

JACKY TAYLOR FOR A BRIEF PERIOD OF REJOICING
Jacky Taylor is a writer and arts education specialist. She writes short stories, flash fiction and is on the final leg of her first novel. Her work has been published in a variety of places online and in print and has won prizes including an Asham Award (2011), a Bridport Prize (2012) and an Ilkley Literature Festival prize (2011). JACKY LIVES IN PORTSMOUTH.

Irenosen Okojie, Tom-Gallon judge says: ” An affecting evocation on loss and loneliness, about the magic of small things and the tantalising allure of what could have been.”

SOMERSET MAUGHAM AWARDS

KAYO CHINGONYI FOR KUMUKANDA (CHATTO & WINDUS) – POETRY
Kayo Chingonyi was born in Zambia in 1987, moving to the UK in 1993. He is a fellow of the Complete Works programme for diversity and quality in British Poetry and the author of two pamphlets, Some Bright Elegance (Salt, 2012) and The Colour of James Brown’s Scream (Akashic, 2016). Kayo has been invited to read from his work around the world and his poems have been translated into Spanish, German, and Swedish. He was awarded the 2012 Geoffrey Dearmer Prize for his poem ‘from calling a spade a spade‘ and served as Associate Poet at the Institute of Contemporary Arts from Autumn 2015 to Spring 2016. KAYO LIVES IN LONDON.

Barney Norris, Somerset Maugham judge says: “This is a rich and sophisticated collection, full of wry insight and rewarding repeated readings. Chingonyi can write – but more excitingly and perhaps more rarely, he can think, and that’s the real delight of this book, his compelling intelligence.”

JENNA CLAKE FOR FORTUNE COOKIE (EYEWEAR PUBLISHING) – POETRY
Jenna Clake was born in Staffordshire in 1992. She is studying for a PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Birmingham, where her research focuses on the Feminine and Feminist Absurd in twenty-first century British and American poetry. Jenna’s poetry has appeared in Poems in Which, The Bohemyth, Oxford Poetry, and more. JENNA LIVES IN NEWCASTLE.

Jen Campbell, Somerset Maugham judge says: “A vibrant, mischievous collection that fizzes.”

J.D. DIXON FOR THE UNRIVALLED TRANSCENDENCE OF WILLEM J. GYLE (ANDREW LOWNIE) – NOVEL
James Dixon was born in London in 1990. He studied English Literature and History at Goldsmiths College, University of London, before pursuing a career as a writer. JAMES LIVES IN EDINBURGH.

Barney Norris, Somerset Maugham judge says: “The young man’s fantasy of rejecting, escaping or failing to fit into the society awaiting him has been written time and again by emerging artists fighting to discern how their lives will work – here, it gains a political force thanks to Dixon’s clarity of thought, as he allies an existential anguish to a very specific social environment. This writer and the press behind him deserve to be celebrated for creating such an original take on a crisis that will be recognisable to anyone who’s been young.”

FIONA MOZLEY FOR ELMET (J M ORIGINALS) – NOVEL
Fiona Mozley grew up in York and has lived in London, Cambridge and Buenos Aires. She is now writing a PhD thesis on the concept of decay in the later Middle Ages, as well as writing fiction. Fiona works part-time at The Little Apple Bookshop. FIONA LIVES IN YORK.

Jen Campbell, Somerset Maugham judge says: “Reading this, I almost expected moss and bracken to sprout from the pages, so vivid is the setting of this outstanding novel, complete with weather-worn characters I’ll struggle to forget. Mozley is a true craftsman.”

MIRIAM NASH FOR ALL THE PRAYER IN THE HOUSE (BLOODAXE BOOKS) – POETRY
Miriam Nash is a poet, performer and educator who grew up in Scotland, England and Wales. She was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study poetry at Sarah Lawrence College in New York and graduated with an MFA in 2014. She has performed her work internationally, and brought poetry into schools, museums, mental health organisations and prisons in the UK, USA and Singapore. She was the first Writer in Residence at Greenway, Agatha Christie’s summer home, as part of Writing Places with the National Trust, Literature Works and The Poetry Archive. Her poetry has appeared in numerous magazines and her pamphlet, Small Change (flipped eye), was published in 2013. She received an Eric Gregory award from the Society of Authors in 2015 and was runner-up for the Edwin Morgan Poetry Award in 2016. MIRIAM LIVES IN LONDON.

Barney Norris, Somerset Maugham judge says: “An absorbing, dreamlike example of how writers can cut through to the spirit of a place and show you the heart of the worlds they have visited.”

• ABOUT THE SOCIETY OF AUTHORS’ AWARDS: The Society of Authors’ Awards is the UK’s biggest literary prize fund and has, since 1943, grown to celebrate poetry, fiction and non-fiction. A collection of eight prizes, uniquely run by authors for authors and shared each year between more than 20 writers, the Authors’ Awards reward, empower and bring recognition to writers at every stage of their careers. They are also, uniquely, gifted by patrons – often writers giving back to an industry they love – and have been created to honour and celebrate the craft and diversity of exceptional writing, with awards going both to established and emerging writers.
• ABOUT THE SOCIETY OF AUTHORS: The UK trade union for all types of writers, scriptwriters, illustrators and literary translators, at all stages of their careers. They have more than 10,000 members and have been advising individuals and speaking out for the profession for more than a century. In 2018, they will award more than £600,000 in prizes and grants (for fiction, non-fiction, poetry and translation), and administer the Women’s Prize for Fiction and The Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award. www.societyofauthors.org
• FOLLOW: The Society of Authors’ Awards via twitter @Soc_of_Authors #AuthorsAwards


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