writing_ie-logo

  • www.inkitt.com
gerry-chaney-blogs-header

Magazine

Historical Fiction

How I came to write The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford
Posted by Elisabeth Gifford in > Historical Fiction > Interviews

It was a small advert for a white cottage by the sea on a remote Scottish island, available to rent for the summer. Just the thought brought tears to my...

Improbable Adventures: Eagles Hunt Wolves by Robert Craven
Posted by Robert Craven in > Historical Fiction

In 2006, I started writing an adventure story in the vein I grew up reading. In June 2011 it was published – Get Lenin. Five years of rewrites, excruciating edits,...

A Matter of Interpretation by Elizabeth Mac Donald
Posted by Elizabeth Mac Donald in > Historical Fiction > Interviews

I finally managed to visit Palermo, Sicily in June 2017. I’ve been living in Italy since October 1986, but Palermo was one of the very few places still on my...

From ‘Date with an Agent’ to Publication: Odin’s Game by Tim Hodkinson
Posted by Tim Hodkinson in > Historical Fiction > Interviews

Last year I boarded the train for Dublin, clutching the manuscript of my novel (then called Einar’s Saga), one of many hopefuls who had won a “Date with an Agent”...

Cití na gCártaí by Réaltán Ní Leannáin
Posted by Réaltán Ní Leannáin in > Historical Fiction > Interviews

I introduce the target readership of my first published book, Turas Ailse (A Trip through Cancer), this way: I hold my hands out wide apart in front of me, as...

On Writing Things in Jars by Jess Kidd

I’ve long wanted to write a novel set in Victorian times and was particularly drawn to the narratives of the Irish settlers in London. They’d done what members of my...

On Waiting: The Lighthouse Keeper’s Daughter by Hazel Gaynor
Posted by Hazel Gaynor in > Historical Fiction > Interviews

They say time waits for no man (erm, or woman), but when it comes to writing time waits for everyone. Whether you’re waiting for submission feedback on your debut novel...

How To Get Published: The Story Collector by Evie Gaughan
Posted by Evie Gaughan in > Historical Fiction > Interviews

Short of giving you a recipe that includes mixing petals from a rare mountain flower, a peregrine’s feather and three teardrops from a unicorn, there is no clear-cut answer to...

Researching The Last Hour by Harry Sidebottom
Posted by Harry Sidebottom in > Crime > Historical Fiction > Interviews

The Last Hour is the first novel that came to me almost fully formed in one image. The hero, Ballista, was standing on top of the Mausoleum of Hadrian. The...

An Added Poignancy: This Tumult by Caroline Preston

I was born into a family with a strong military tradition on both sides. As a child I assumed that everyone had parents who had ‘been in the war.’ Growing...